Accommodations

/Tag:Accommodations

Win in Federal Court for Our Clients!

2018-03-21T18:52:28+00:00

Today our triplet clients had another huge win against the Miami-Dade County School District - the fourth largest in the country.  We're so thrilled to report that Judge Joan Lenard of the Federal District Court of the Southern District of Florida denied the school board's motion to dismiss our case.  Our clients, who won a due process case against the district under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, filed a complaint in federal court to enforce that win and the school district tied to get the case dismissed.  Today that motion to dismiss the case was denied.  This is a great development because if [...]

Win in Federal Court for Our Clients! 2018-03-21T18:52:28+00:00

Making School Work Wins Three Lawsuits Against the 4th Largest School District in the U.S.

2015-11-14T23:00:51+00:00

An Administrative Law Judge of the State of Florida Division of Administrative Hearings (Case Nos. 14­5679E, 14­5668E, 14­5669E) ruled last month that the Miami­Dade County School Board, which oversees the fourth largest school district in the country, violated the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for failing to adequately educate very intelligent triplets with learning disabilities and ADHD at a well­regarded STEM magnet high school, the Marine Academy of Science and Technology (MAST@Florida International University). The students met the rigorous academic and behavioral admissions requirements of the school, but quickly landed on academic probation when the school failed to implement the accommodations [...]

Making School Work Wins Three Lawsuits Against the 4th Largest School District in the U.S. 2015-11-14T23:00:51+00:00

Allison Hertog Speaks to the Florida Psychological Association

2015-11-13T23:11:27+00:00

Today Allison Hertog and Samantha Carella spoke to the Miami-Dade and Monroe Chapter of the Florida Psychological Association about Helping Disabled Students Obtain their Legal Entitlements: Grades K-12 and Beyond.  Ms. Hertog and Dr. Carella spoke for nearly three hours including actual case studies on which they collaborated to help special needs students improve their educational performance.  The topics involved advocacy in K-12 public schools as well as helping high-achievers with disabilities obtain accommodations on high-stakes exams. Their PowerPoint presentation is available here. FLPA Presentation

Allison Hertog Speaks to the Florida Psychological Association 2015-11-13T23:11:27+00:00

Can A Child with Behavior Problems Survive in a Typical Classroom?

2013-01-27T12:05:55+00:00

This issue is really getting to me lately.  It seems I have several clients right now who have bright kids who are perfectly capable of doing well in a general education classroom but for their behavior problems.  The schools I'm dealing with often want to transfer the kids to special education classrooms which are exclusively for kids with "emotional or behavior disorders" or to another type of classroom purely for kids in special education, such as a class for kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). "EBD" or Other Self-Contained Classrooms EBD classrooms are generally "self-contained" that means that they have only special education students [...]

Can A Child with Behavior Problems Survive in a Typical Classroom? 2013-01-27T12:05:55+00:00

Finally, Some Good News for Gifted and Disabled!

2012-12-06T10:52:34+00:00

One of the most challenging and infuriating areas in which I practice is advocating for the gifted and disabled (called "twice exceptional") these days.  I feel particularly passionately about these cases because I fall into the category of twice exceptional (I suffer from multiple learning disabilities) and when I was a student in public school, I was left back in second grade and misdiagnosed as cognitively "slow." I am continually arguing to the school districts in South Florida that a gifted student should not be denied special education and related services soley because they are capable of performing at or above grade level.  I understand that the denial [...]

Finally, Some Good News for Gifted and Disabled! 2012-12-06T10:52:34+00:00

Can the ADA Help Your Child in School? Yes, Now More Than Ever!

2012-02-15T10:46:40+00:00

If you're reading this blog, you've probably heard of the ADA - Americans with Disabilities Act – that’s the landmark piece of civil rights 1990 legislation which requires wheelchair accessible bathrooms, for instance.  But what you may not know is whether the ADA applies to your disabled child in school.  You'd think it would, right?  But then, why does everyone talk about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) all the time?  Well, Title II of the ADA does apply to your disabled child in school.  Not just with respect to students with physical disabilities in wheelchairs, but also to any [...]

Can the ADA Help Your Child in School? Yes, Now More Than Ever! 2012-02-15T10:46:40+00:00

Congress Comes to the Rescue of Learning Disabled Students: Now Easier to Get a 504 Plan

2009-01-29T10:02:37+00:00

In the past, as many of you know, it has been extremely difficult for a learning disabled student who has performed well in school by compensating for his or her disabilities to obtain a 504 Plan.  That was because the law (Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act as interpreted by most school districts) stated that students who achieved well in school could not, by definition, have a disability which "substantially limited" the "major life activity" of learning - even if they suffered from a learning disability, ADHD or other disability. Getting a 504 Plan for that [...]

Congress Comes to the Rescue of Learning Disabled Students: Now Easier to Get a 504 Plan 2009-01-29T10:02:37+00:00

Accommodations in Grades K-12. How to Navigate the Public System. . .

2008-12-02T12:14:03+00:00

  Once the psycho-educational evaluation of your son or daughter is complete (See this post for more details on getting an evaluation), if a disability is found the next step will be to have a school meeting to determine if that disability significantly impacts his or her educational performance.  That sounds simple enough, but can actually be a great sticking point, particularly for gifted and disabled students. I covered that topic in detail in an article reprinted on the ISER web site. One thing is for sure that a student does not have to be failing in order to qualify for [...]

Accommodations in Grades K-12. How to Navigate the Public System. . . 2008-12-02T12:14:03+00:00

Accommodations for Entrance Exams. . .

2008-12-02T12:09:57+00:00

Getting accommodations from the College Board (which administers the SAT, AP exams and others) or from any other standardized testing or professional licensing boards, is even more difficult, and is governed by a whole different set of laws, than getting accommodations in public grade school. When a parent of a disabled child come to me for help getting accommodations on these exams, here are some of the key questions I ask (none of which are determinative in and of themselves): 1.  When was your child diagnosed with a disability? 2.  Has your child been getting accommodations for tests in school? 3.  [...]

Accommodations for Entrance Exams. . . 2008-12-02T12:09:57+00:00

How Do I Know if My Child Needs Accommodations?

2008-12-02T12:06:01+00:00

If your child is capable of learning and demonstrating his knowledge, but not in the same way, at the same rate or under the same conditions as his or her typical peers,* your child may be legally entitled to accommodations.  The first step is to find out if he or she has a disability usually by getting a psycho-educational evaluation (i.e., a set of standardized tests given by a psychologist who can determine if a student has learning difficulties or not).  If your son or daughter is a public grade school student, and you or the teacher believes they may be [...]

How Do I Know if My Child Needs Accommodations? 2008-12-02T12:06:01+00:00