Behavior Problems

/Behavior Problems

Charter Schools, the Time is Now to Take On Special Ed in a Big Way

2014-04-01T11:45:19+00:00

Charter schools and special education. Two concepts antithetical to each other? Not in my book. A handful of public charters are already doing a bang-up job educating kids with disabilities, I swear. And some visionary charter school leaders already see special education not merely as a political liability, which it is now more than ever, but as an opportunity to propel charters even further into the mainstream and to prove that charters can do special education better than the traditional public school system – unfortunately, that shouldn’t be a very difficult feat. But why would I have so much faith in [...]

Charter Schools, the Time is Now to Take On Special Ed in a Big Way2014-04-01T11:45:19+00:00

The Promising Future of Virtual SpEd

2013-12-02T17:34:57+00:00

In my role as a special education advocate working primarily in Miami-Dade – the fourth largest public school district in the country – I’ve participated in hundreds of school meetings.   Naturally as an advocate, I meet lots of dissatisfied parents, but I also see very unhappy teachers and administrators who are equally frustrated with a special education system laden with laws and red tape that often doesn’t result in even adequate educational achievement. One bright light in Miami is an emphasis on high quality online education options for struggling learners which they can access at home and in school.  Virtual ed [...]

The Promising Future of Virtual SpEd2013-12-02T17:34:57+00:00

Can A Child with Behavior Problems Survive in a Typical Classroom?

2013-01-27T12:05:55+00:00

This issue is really getting to me lately.  It seems I have several clients right now who have bright kids who are perfectly capable of doing well in a general education classroom but for their behavior problems.  The schools I'm dealing with often want to transfer the kids to special education classrooms which are exclusively for kids with "emotional or behavior disorders" or to another type of classroom purely for kids in special education, such as a class for kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). "EBD" or Other Self-Contained Classrooms EBD classrooms are generally "self-contained" that means that they have only special education students [...]

Can A Child with Behavior Problems Survive in a Typical Classroom?2013-01-27T12:05:55+00:00

Bullying May Violate Disabled Child’s Civil Rights

2013-01-26T14:18:20+00:00

Bullying is a hot topic in the news lately as well it should.   And as a special education attorney I hear about students with disabilities being bullied frequently.  See this article from StopBullingNow.com and this site EyesonBullying for good advice about what to do if your child is being bullied. The Obama administration is pressuring schools to help curb bullying, particularly when the victim it targeted because he or she has a disability, is gay or is part of another protected group (such as a racial or ethnic minority).  Last week, the U.S. Department of Ed. released some formal federal [...]

Bullying May Violate Disabled Child’s Civil Rights2013-01-26T14:18:20+00:00

Even If You Could Get a 1:1 Aide, Here’s Why You May Not Want One.

2013-01-24T09:42:13+00:00

I hear it less now than I used to, but parents still routinely ask whether I can help their child get a 1:1 aide (meaning a paraprofessional who is ostensibly hired only to support a single child). My first response is that it's always been very difficult, but due to budget cuts, it's more difficult now than ever.  My next response is that aides are not usually the answer to helping kids stay in a mainstream or gifted class. I recently heard a prominent Miami-Dade school official say at an IEP meeting for a disabled who qualified to be in the [...]

Even If You Could Get a 1:1 Aide, Here’s Why You May Not Want One.2013-01-24T09:42:13+00:00

Gov Christ Signs Law on Restraint and Seclusion of Students with Disabilities

2010-06-28T13:38:24+00:00

On June 4, Gov Charlie Christ signed into law the state’s first regulations for the use of restraint and seclusion on public school students with disabilities. The law requires that a school prepare an incident report within a specified period after each occasion of student restraint or seclusion and that the school notify the student's parent or guardian if manual physical restraint or seclusion is used. It also prohibits school employees from using certain types of restrictions and restraints. These include forbidding a mechanical or manual restraint that restricts breathing, and prohibiting school employees from locking a disabled student in a [...]

Gov Christ Signs Law on Restraint and Seclusion of Students with Disabilities2010-06-28T13:38:24+00:00